Navigation


Print This Page

Common Terms M-Q

Main Vent (or Stack): Principal vent to which branch vents may be connected. See Stack.

Male IPS: Pipe connection where the threads are on the outside of the fitting. See MIP.

Male Threads: See MIP.

Mansard Roof: A roof which rises by inclined planes from all four sides of a building. The sloping roofs on all four sides have two pitches, the lower pitch usually very steep and the upper pitch less steep.

Mantel: The shelf above a fireplace. Also used in referring to the decorative trim around a fireplace opening.

Manufactured Wood: A wood product such as a truss, beam, Glue Lam or joist which is manufactured out of smaller wood pieces and glued or mechanically fastened to form a larger piece. Often used to create a stronger member which may use less wood. See Oriented Strand Board.

Manufacturers Specifications: The written installation and/or maintenance instructions which are developed by the manufacturer of a product and which may have to be followed in order to maintain the product warrantee.

Mason's Hammer (Bricklayer's Hammer): Tool shaped like a chisel to trim brick or stone.

Masonry: Stone, brick, concrete, hollow-tile, concrete block, gypsum block, or other similar building units or materials or a combination of the same, bonded together with mortar to form a wall, pier, buttress, or similar mass.

Masonry Primer: An asphalt-based primer used to prepare masonry surfaces for bonding with other asphalt products.

Mastic: Heavy-consistency compound that may remain adhesive and pliable with age. Is typically a waterproof compound applied to exterior walls and roof surfaces.

Matched Lumber: Lumber that is dressed and shaped on one edge in a grooved pattern and on the other in a tongued pattern.

Maximum Occupancy Load: The maximum number of people permitted in a room. It is measured per foot for each width of exit door. The maximum is 50 per foot of exit.

Mechanics Lien: A lien on real property, created by statue in many years, in favor of persons supplying labor or materials for a building or structure for the value of labor or materials supplied by them. In some jurisdictions, a mechanics lien also exists for the value of professional services. Clear title to the property cannot be obtained until the claim for the labor, materials, or professional services is settled. Timely filing is essential to support the encumbrance, and prescribed filing dates vary by jurisdiction.

Melt Point: The temperature at which solid asphalt becomes a liquid.

Membrane: A generic term relating to a variety of sheet goods used for certain built-up roofing repairs and application.

Metal Edge: Brake metal or metal extrusions which are secured at the perimeter of the roof to form a weather-tight seal.

Metal Lath: Sheets of metal that are slit and drawn out to form openings. Used as a plaster base for walls and ceilings and as reinforcing over other forms of plaster base.

Microlam: A manufactured structural wood beam. It is constructed of pressure and adhesive bonded wood strands of wood. They have a higher strength rating than solid saw lumber. Normally comes in l ½" thickness' and 9 ½", 11 ½" and 14" widths.

Migration: Spreading or creeping of a constituent of a compound onto/into adjacent surfaces. See bleeding.

Mil Thickness: Measurement used to determine thickness of a coating. 1 mil = .001 inch (1/1000).

Milar (Mylar): Plastic, transparent copies of a blueprint.

Millwork: Generally all building materials made of finished wood and manufactured in millwork plants and planing mills are included under the term "millwork." It includes such items as inside and outside doors, window and doorframes, blinds, porchwork, mantels, panelwork, stairways, moldings, and interior trim. It normally does not include flooring, ceiling, or siding.

Mineral Spirits: A by-product of petroleum, clear in color, used as a solvent for asphalt coatings.

Mineral Stabilizers: Finely ground limestone, slate, traprock or other inert materials added to asphalt coatings for durability and increased resistance to fire and weathering.

Mineral-Surfaced Roofing: Asphalt shingles and roll roofing that are covered with granules.

Minispread: A smaller variation of a widespread faucet with separate spout and handles designed small enough to fit 4" center-to-center faucet holes.

MIP (Male Iron Pipe): Standard threads that are on the outside of a pipe or fitting.

Miter Joint: The joint of two pieces at an angle that bisects the joining angle. For example, the miter joint at the side and head casing at a door opening is made at a 45° angle.

Mixing Valve: A valve that mixes hot and cold water in the valve to obtain a set temperature prior to delivery.

Mobile Home Aluminum Roof Coating: Durable one-coat application prolongs the life of mobile home roofs while reflecting sun's rays and providing a decorative surface. Reduces energy costs.

Mock-Up Testing: Controlled air, water and structural performance testing of existing or new glazing systems.

Modified Bitumen Roof: A roof covering that is typically composed of a factory-fabricated composite sheet consisting of a copolymer-modified bitumen, often reinforced with polyester and/or fiberglass, and installed in one or more plies. The membrane is commonly surfaced with field-applied coatings, factory-applied granules or metal foil. The roofing system may incorporate rigid insulation.

Modulus: Stress at a given strain. Also tensile strength at a given elongation.

Moisture Content of Wood: Weight of the water contained in the wood, usually expressed as a percentage of the weight of the oven-dry wood.

Molding: A wood strip having a coned or projecting surface used for decorative purposes, e.g., door and window trim.

Monitor: A large structure rising above the surrounding roof planes, designed to give light and/or ventilation to the building interior.

Monopost: Adjustable metal column used to support a beam or bearing point. Normally 11 gauge or Schedule 40 metal, and determined by the structural engineer.

Mopping: In roofing, a layer of hot bitumen mopped between plies of roofing felt. Full mopping is the application of bitumen by mopping in such a manner that the surface being mopped is entirely coated with a reasonably uniform coating. Spot Mopping is the procedure of applying hot bitumen in a random fashion of small daubs, as compared to full mopping. Sprinkle mopping is a special application of installing insulation to the decks. It is done by dipping a roof mop into hot bitumen and sprinkling the material onto the deck. Strip Mopping is the application of bitumen in parallel bands.

Mortar Types: Type M is suitable for general use and is recommended specifically for masonry below grade and in contact with earth, such as foundations, retaining walls and walks. Type M is the strongest type. Type S is suitable for general use and is recommended where high resistance to lateral forces is required. Type N is suitable for general use in exposed masonry above grade and is recommended specifically for exterior walls subject to severe exposures. Type O is recommended for load-bearing walls of solid units where the compressive stresses do not exceed 100 lbs. per square inch and the masonry wall not be subjected to freezing and thawing in the presence of excessive moisture.

Mortgage: Loan secured by land.

Mortgage Broker: A broker who represents numerous lenders and helps consumers find affordable mortgages; the broker charges a fee only if the consumer finds a loan.

Mortgage Company: A company that borrows money from a bank, lends it to consumers to buy homes, then sells the loans to investors.

Mortgage Deed: Legal document establishing a loan on property.

Mortgage Origination Fee: A charge for work involved in preparing and servicing a mortgage application (usually one percent of the loan amount).

Mortgagee: The lender who makes the mortgage loan.

Mortise: A slot cut into a board, plank, or timber, usually edgewise, to receive tenon of another board, plank, or timber to form a joint.

Mud Cracks: Cracks developing from the normal shrinkage of an emulsion coating when applied too heavily.

Mudsill: A wood foundation member, usually a pressure treated 2x4 or 2x6, bolted to the foundation and on which other framing members can be attached.

Mullion: A vertical bar or divider in the frame between windows, doors, or other openings that supports and holds such items as panels, glass, sash, or sections of a curtain wall.

Muntins: Horizontal or vertical bars that divide the sash frame into smaller lights of glass. Muntins are smaller in dimensions and weight than mullions.

Muriatic Acid: Commonly used as a brick cleaner after masonry work is completed.

Mushroom: An unacceptable occurrence when the top of a caisson concrete pier spreads out and hardens to become wider than the foundation wall thickness.

NACHI Foundation: A Maryland based charitable organization funded by members of the National Association of Certified Home Inspectors.

Nailer: A piece of lumber secured to non-nailable decks and walls by bolts or other means, which provides a suitable backing onto which roof components may be mechanically fastened.

Natural Finish: A transparent finish which does not seriously alter the original color or grain of the natural wood. Natural finishes are usually provided by sealers, oils, varnishes, water-repellent preservatives, and other similar materials.

Neat Plaster: A base coat plaster which does not contain aggregates and is used where the addition of aggregates on the job is desired.

NEC (National Electrical Code): A set of rules governing safe wiring methods. Local codes—which are backed by law—may differ from the NEC in some ways.

Neoprene: A synthetic rubber having physical properties closely resembling those of natural rubber. It is made by polymerizing chloroprenes, which are produced from acetylene and hydrogen chloride.

Nesting: A method of re-roofing with new asphalt shingles over old shingles in which the top edge of the new shingles is butted against the bottom edge of the existing shingle tab.

Neutral Wire: Usually color-coded white, the neutral wire carries electricity from an outlet back to the service panel. Also see Hot Wire and Ground.

Newel: A post to which the end of a stair railing or balustrade is fastened. Also, any post to which a railing or balustrade is fastened.

Nipple: A short pipe installed between fittings. A pipe coupling that is threaded on both ends.

NM: A type of Romex cable (nonmetallic sheathed cable that contains several conductors). The cable, which is flame-retardant, is limited to use in dry locations only and can not be exposed to excessive moisture.

NMC (Non Metallic Conduit): A type of Romex cable (nonmetallic sheathed cable that contains several conductors). NMC may be used in damp or corrosive locations as well as dry areas.

No-Cutout Shingles: Shingles consisting of a single, solid tab with no cutouts.

Nominal Size: Size used for identification only; not literal dimensions.

Non-Bearing Wall: A wall supporting no load other than its own weight.

Non-Destructive: A phrase describing a method of examining the interior of a component whereby no damage is done to the component itself.

Non-Drying (Non-Curing): A sealant that does not set up or cure. See Butyl.

Non-fibered Aluminum Roof Coating: Thin but efficient reflective barrier to reflect sun's harmful rays and prolong surface life. Also works on metal surfaces.

Non-Sag: A sealant formulation having a consistency that will permit application in vertical joints without appreciable sagging or slumping. This performance characteristic allows the sealant to be installed in a sloped or vertical joint application without appreciable sagging or slumping.

Non-Skinning: Descriptive of a product that does not form a surface skin.

Non-Staining: Characteristic of a compound that will not stain a surface.

Non-Veneer Panel: Any wood-based panel that does not contain veneer and carries an APA span rating, such as wafer board or oriented strand board.

Nonfibered Roof and Foundation Coating: Dual purposed, this thin-viscosity material doubles as a nonfibered roof or foundation coating.

Normal Slope Application: Method of installing asphalt shingles on roof slopes between 4 inches and 21 inches per foot.

Nosing: The projecting edge of a molding or drip. Usually applied to the projecting molding on the edge of a stair tread.

Notch: A crosswise rabbet at the end of a board.

Note: A formal document showing the existence of a debt and stating the terms of repayment.

Nozzle: The tubular tip of a caulking gun through which the compound is extruded.

Nuclear Meter: A device used to detect moisture by measuring slowed, deflected neutrons.

O-Ring: Round rubber washer or gasket that is compressed to create a watertight seal, typically in a compression fitting.

O. G. (or Ogee): A molding with a profile in the form of a letter S; having the outline of a reversed curve.

Oakum: Loose hemp or jute fiber that is impregnated with tar or pitch and used to caulk large seams or for packing plumbing pipe joints.

OD (Outside Diameter): A measurement of the diameter of a pipe as taken from the outside edge. A common method for sizing pipe.

Offset: A tubular component which permits the offsetting of a drainage run in the same basic direction.

Ohm's Law: States that, in a given electrical circuit, the amount at current in amps is equal to the pressure in volts divided by the resistance in ohms. The formula is: I (Current) = V voltage or V = I x R R resistance or R = V/I.

Ohmmeter: In electrical contracting, a device to measure the resistance across a load. They are never used on a live circuit. Used to track down broken wires.

Oil-Canning: The term describing distortion of thin-gauge metal panels which are fastened in a manner restricting normal thermal movement.

On Center (O.C.): A measurement term meaning a certain distance between like materials. Studs rafters, joists, and the like in a building placed at 16 inches O.C. will be laid out so that there is 16 inches from the center of one stud to the center of the next.

Open Hole Inspection: When an engineer (or municipal inspector) inspects the open excavation and examines the earth to determine the type of foundation (caisson, footer, wall on ground, etc.) that should be installed in the hole.

Open Valley: Method of valley construction in which shingles on both sides of the valley are trimmed along a chalk line snapped on each side of the valley. Shingles do not extend across the valley. Valley flashing is exposed.

Organic: A term designating any chemical compound which contains carbon and hydrogen.

Organic Felt: An asphalt roofing base material manufactured from cellulose fibers.

Oriented Strand Board (OSB, Chip Board, Wafer Board): A manufactured wood panel made out of 1"- 2" wood chips and glue. Often used as a substitute for plywood in the exterior wall and roof sheathing.

Outrigger: An extension of a rafter beyond the wall line. Usually a smaller member nailed to a larger rafter to form a cornice or roof overhang.

Overhang: That part of the roof structure which extends horizontally beyond the vertical plane of the exterior walls of a building.

Oxidize: To combine with oxygen in the air.

P Trap: P-shaped section of drain pipe that prevents sewer odors from escaping into your home. Water is trapped in the pipe blocking gases from escaping through the drain.

Pad Out, Pack Out: To shim out or add strips of wood to a wall or ceiling in order that the finished ceiling/wall will appear correct.

Padding: A material installed under carpet to add foot comfort, isolate sound, and to prolong carpet life.

Paint: A combination of pigments with suitable thinners or oils to provide decorative and protective coatings.

Pallets: Wooden platforms used for storing and shipping bundles of shingles.

Panel: In house construction, a thin flat piece of wood, plywood, or similar material, framed by stiles and rails as in a door or fitted into grooves of thicker material with molded edges for decorative wall treatment.

Parapet Wall: A low wall around the perimeter of a roof deck.

Parge Coat: A thin application of plaster for coating a wall.

Parking Strip: The area in front of a building between the sidewalk and the street usually landscaped with grass. The parking strip serves as a buffer between the road and pedestrians walking on the sidewalk.

Parting Stop or Strip: A small wood piece used in the side and head jambs of double-hung windows to separate upper and lower sash.

Partition: A wall that subdivides spaces within any story of a building.

Patterned Glass: A type of rolled glass having a pattern impressed on one or both sides. Used extensively for light control, bath enclosures and decorative glazing. Sometimes call "rolled," "figured," or "obscure" glass.

Paver Stones: Usually pre-cast concrete slabs used to create a traffic surface.

Payment Schedule: A pre-agreed upon schedule of payments to a contractor usually based upon the amount of work completed. Such a schedule may include a deposit prior to the start of work. Payments are often scheduled for the beginning of the month and allow the contractor to subcontractors and suppliers by the 10th of the month. There may also be a temporary 'holdout' at the end of the contract for any small items which have not been completed.

Pedestal Lavatory: A lavatory in which the bowl is supported by a single pedestal leg.

Penalty Clause: A provision in a contract that provides for a reduction in the amount otherwise payable under a contract to a contractor as a penalty for failure to meet deadlines or for failure of the project to meet contract specifications.

Penny: As applied to nails, it originally indicated the price per hundred. The term now serves as a measure of nail length and is abbreviated by the letter "D."

Penthouse: A relatively small structure built above the plane of the roof.

Percolation Test (Perc Test): Tests that a soil engineer performs on earth to determine the feasibility of installing a leech field type sewer system on a lot. A test to determine if the soil on a proposed building lot is capable of absorbing the liquid affluent from a septic system.

Performance and Payment Bond: Guaranty by a surety company that if a contractor fails to perform under a contract, the surety company will complete the work.

Performance Bond: An amount of money (usually 10% of the total price of a job) that a contractor must put on deposit with a governmental agency as an insurance policy that guarantees the contractors' proper and timely completion of a project or job.

Perimeter Drain: 3" or 4" perforated plastic pipe that goes around the perimeter (either inside or outside) of a foundation wall (before backfill) and collects and diverts ground water away from the foundation. Generally, it is "daylighted" into a sump pit inside the home, and a sump pump is sometimes inserted into the pit to discharge any accumulation of water.

Perlite: An aggregate formed by heating and expanding siliceous volcanic glass.

Perm: A measure of water vapor movement through a material (grains per square foot per hour per inch of mercury difference in vapor pressure).

Permanent Set: The amount by which a material fails to return to its original dimensions after being deformed by an applied force or load.

Permit: A governmental authorization to perform a building process as in: Zoning\Use permit - authorization to use a property for a specific use e.g. a factory, a single family residence etc. Grading permit - authorization to change the contour of the land. Septic permit - a health dept. authorization to build or modify a septic system. Building permit - authorization to build or modify a structure. Electrical permit - a separate permit required for most electrical work. Plumbing permit - a separate permit required for new plumbing and larger modifications of existing plumbing systems.

Photo-Oxidation: Oxidation caused by rays of the sun.

Pier: A column of masonry, usually rectangular in horizontal cross section, used to support other structural members.

Pier Block: A concrete block used to support foundation members such as posts, beams, girders and joist.

Pigment: A powdered solid in suitable degree of subdivision for use in paint or enamel.

Pigtails, Electrical: The electric cord that the electrician provides and installs on an appliance such as a garbage disposal, dishwasher, or range hood.

Pilot Hole: A small-diameter, pre-drilled hole that guides a nail or screw.

Pilot Light: A small, continuous flame (in a hot water heater, boiler, or furnace) that ignites gas or oil burners when needed.

Pitch: (a) The incline slope of a roof or the ratio of the total rise to the total width of a house, i.e., an 8-foot rise and 24-foot width is a one-third pitch roof. Roof slope is expressed in the inches of rise per foot of run. A term frequently used to designate coal tar pitch.

Pitch Pan or Pitch Pocket: A container, usually formed of sheet metal, around supporting connections with roof-mounted machinery. Filling the container with pitch, or better yet, plastic roof cement, helps seal out water even when vibration is present.

Pitch Pocket: An opening extending parallel to the annual rings of growth, that usually contains, or has contained, either solid or liquid pitch.

Pith: The small, soft core at the original center of a tree around which wood formation takes place.

PITI: Principal, interest, taxes and insurance (the four major components of monthly housing payments).

Plan Submittal: Submission of construction plans to the city or county in order to obtain a Building Permit.

Plans: See Blue Prints.

Plaster Grounds: Strips of wood used as guides or strike off edges around window and door openings and at base of walls.

Plastic Roof Cement: Used as a waterproofing medium in new construction and as a general-purpose exterior repair and maintenance material. Stops roof and other leaks fast. Available in both summer and winter grades.

Plat: A map of a geographical area as recorded by the county.

Plate: Sill plate: a horizontal member anchored to a masonry wall. Sole plate: bottom horizontal member of a frame wall. Top plate: top horizontal member of a frame wall supporting ceiling joists, rafters, or other members.

Plate Line: The top horizontal line of a building wall upon which the roof rests.

Platform Framing (Platform Construction): A system of framing a building in which floor joists of each story rest on the top plates of the story below or on the foundation sill for the first story, and the bearing walls and partitions rest on the subfloor of each story. (Usually one story constitutes a platform.)

Plenum (or Plenum Chamber): Chamber or container for moving air under a slight positive pressure to which one or more ducts are connected.

Plot Plan: A bird’s eye view showing how a building sits on the building lot, typically showing setbacks (how far the building must sit from the road), easements, rights of way, and drainage.

Plough: To cut a lengthwise groove in a board or plank.

Plumb: Exactly perpendicular; vertical.

Plumb Bob: A lead weight attached to a string. It is the tool used in determining plumb.

Plumbing Boots: Metal saddles used to strengthen a bearing wall/vertical stud(s) where a plumbing drain line has been cut through and installed.

Plumbing Ground: The plumbing drain and waste lines that are installed beneath a basement floor.

Plumbing Jacks: Sleeves that fit around drain and waste vent pipes at and are nailed to the roof sheeting.

Plumbing Rough: Work performed by the plumbing contractor after the Rough Heat is installed. This work includes installing all plastic ABS drain and waste lines, copper water lines, bath tubs, shower pans, and gas piping to furnaces and fireplaces. Lead solder should not be used on copper piping.

Plumbing Stack: A plumbing vent pipe that penetrates the roof.

Plumbing Trim: Work performed by the plumbing contractor to get the home ready for a final plumbing inspection. Includes installing all toilets (water closets), hot water heaters, sinks, connecting all gas pipe to appliances, disposal, dishwasher, and all plumbing items.

Plumbing Waste Line: Plastic pipe used to collect and drain sewage waste.

Ply: A term to denote the number of thicknesses or layers of roofing felt, veneer in plywood, or layers in built-up materials, in any finished piece of such material.

Ply Sheet: A layer in built-up roofing.

Plywood: A piece of wood made of three or more layers of veneer joined with glue, and usually laid with the grain of adjoining plies at right angles. Almost always an odd number of plies are used to provide balanced construction.

Pocket (Channel): A three-sided, U-shaped opening in a sash or frame to receive glazing infill. Contrasted to a rabbet, which is a two-sided, L-shaped sections as with face glazed window sash.

Point Load: A point where a bearing/structural weight is concentrated and transferred to the foundation.

Pointing: The process where joints between masonry units, brick, etc., are filled with mortar.

Polished Wired Glass: Wired glass that has been ground and polished on both surfaces.

Polymer: A substance consisting of large molecules which have been formed from smaller molecules of similar make-up.

Polysulfide Sealant: Polysulfide liquid polymer sealant which is mercaptan terminated, long chain aliphatic polymers containing disulfide linkages. They can be converted to rubbers at room temperature without shrinkage upon addition of a curing agent.

Polyurethane Sealant: An organic compound formed by reaction of a glycol with an isocyanate.

Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC): Polymer formed by polymerization of vinyl chloride monomer. Sometimes called vinyl.

Ponding: A condition where water stands on a roof for prolonged periods due to poor drainage and/or deflection of the deck.

Pop Rivets: Fasteners used to join pieces of metal that are installed by either compressed-air-assisted or hand-operated guns. Unique in that they are installed from one side of the work.

Pop-Out: See Stucco Pop-Out.

Pores: Wood cells of comparatively large diameter that have open ends and are set one above the other to form continuous tubes. The openings of the vessels on the surface of a piece of wood are referred to as pores.

Porosity: The density of substance and its capacity to pass liquids.

Portland Cement: A mixture of certain minerals which when mixed with water form a gray colored paste and cure into a very hard mass.

Post: A vertical member of wood, steel, concrete or other material that transfers weight from the top of the post to whatever the post is resting on.

Post & Beam Construction: Most common type of wall framing, using posts which carry horizontal beams on which joists are supported. It allows for fewer bearing partitions and less material.

Post-and-Beam: A basic building method that uses just a few hefty posts and beams to support an entire structure. Contrasts with stud framing.

Pot-Life: The time interval following the addition of an accelerator before chemically curing material will become too viscous to apply satisfactorily. See Shelf Life.

Potable: Water that is safe to drink.

Powder Coat: A technique for applying paint to metal surfaces. The metal is covered with a powder of dry paint particles and is baked in an oven. This causes the powder to melt and harden into a tough, colorful finish.

Power: The energy rate, usually measured in watts. Power equals voltage times amps, or W = E x 1. The heavier the flow of amps at a given supply, the higher the rate at which energy is being supplied and used.

Power Vent: A vent that includes a fan to speed up air flow. Often installed on roofs.

Pre-Shimed Tape Sealant: A sealant having a pre-formed shape containing solids or discrete particles that limit its deformation under compression.

Precast: Concrete building components which are formed and cured at a factory and then transported to a work site for erection.

Premium: Amount payable on a loan.

Preservative: Any substance that, for a reasonable length of time, will prevent the action of wood-destroying fungi, borers of various kinds, and similar destructive agents when the wood has been properly coated or impregnated with it.

Pressure Tank: Used in conjuction with wells to maintain pressure.

Pressure-Reducing Valve: Valve installed in the water service line where it enters the building to reduce the pressure of water in the line to an acceptable pressure used in buildings (40-55 psi desired).

Pressure-Relief Valve: Valve to relieve excess pressure in water storage tanks.

Pressure-Treated Lumber: Lumber that is treated in such a way that the sealer is forced into the pores of the wood.

Primer: A material of relatively thin consistency applied to a surface for the purpose of creating a more secure bonding surface and to form a barrier to prevent migration of components. The first coat of paint in a paint job that consists of two or more coats. Also, the paint used for such a first coat.

Priming: Sealing of a porous surface so that compounds will not stain, lose elasticity, shrink excessively, etc. because of loss of oil or vehicle into the surround.

Principal: The original amount of the loan, the capital.

Projection: In roofing, any object or equipment which pierces the roof membrane.

Property Survey: A survey to determine the boundaries of a property. The cost depends on the complexity of the survey.

Protection Board: In roofing, heavy asphalt impregnated boards which are laid over bituminous coatings to protect against mechanical injury.

Pump Mix: Special concrete that will be used in a concrete pump. Generally, the mix has smaller rock aggregate than regular mix.

Punch List: A list of discrepancies that need to be corrected by the contractor.

Punch Out: To inspect and make a discrepancy list.

Purlins: A horizontal structural member spanning between beams or trusses to support a roof deck. In slope glazing, purlins are the horizontal framing members.

Push Stick: In hardware, a tool used when cutting a short board on a table saw.

Putty: A type of cement usually made of whiting and boiled linseed oil, beaten or kneaded to the consistency of dough, and used in sealing glass in sash, filling small holes and crevices in wood, and for similar purposes.

PVC or CPVC (PolyVinyl Choride): A type of white plastic pipe sometimes used for water supply lines.

PVD (Physical Vapor Deposition): A very durable titanium or zirconium coating that resists tarnish, scratches, and corrosion. It is used mostly to protect faucets with a brass finish.

PVDF: Architectural coating. See Kynar Coating.

Quarry Tile: A man-made or machine-made clay tile used to finish a floor or wall. Generally 6"X6"X1/4" thick .

Quarter Round: A small molding that has the cross section of a quarter circle.

Quartersawn Grain: Another term for edge grain.

Quick-Setting Cement: An asphalt-based cement used to adhere tabs of strip shingles to the course below. Also used to adhere roll roofing laps applied by the concealed nail method.

Quote or Quotation: A price provided by a contractor, sub-contractor, or vendor to funish materials, labor and/or both. Quotes differ from estimates in that an estimate is a best guess of the cost involved.

Previous page: Common Terms H-L
Next page: Common Terms R-S